Low Voltage Directive

Are the the Low Voltage Directive and Machinery Directive mutually exclusive in their application?

Certain categories of electrical and electronic machinery products are excluded from the scope of the Machinery Directive as per Article…

Certain categories of electrical and electronic machinery products are excluded from the scope of the Machinery Directive as per Article 1(2) k.
-Household appliances intended for domestic use
-Audio and video equipment
-Information Technology Equipment
-Ordinary office machinery
-Low voltage switchgear and controlgear
-Electric motors
All electrical and electronic equipment that does not fall into one of the above categories but meets the definitions of article 2 of the Machinery Directive is thus in the scope of the Machinery Directive.

Last updated: 2021-07-06 16:40

Posted 11 months ago
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There is a fundamental misconception here which needs to be addressed. The fuse in a BS 1363 style plug is there to protect the mains cord of the appliance, not the appliance itself. The logic of this is that under some circumstances a fault in the mains cord of an appliance will not cause a 30A ring main circuit breaker to trip in less time than it takes for the cable to catch fire. On the continent, they do not have ring mains but instead do everything with 16A fused spurs. These are more sensitive and so the possibility of fire in the mains cord is much reduced.

If the product design is such that it needs to have a fuse in order to meet the requirements of the applicable safety standards (e.g. so as to provide protection in one of the 'abnormal' test in the standard, then the fuse must be in the appliance itself, not in the mains cord.

The issue of the fuse ending up in the neutral where the mains cord is reversible is a known problem, and it is recognised that the standards do not deal with it very well. You will need to look to the appliance standard (probably EN 60335 in this case) rather than the controls standard since it is the way the appliance is used which matters here as much as or more than than the way in which the control is used. I'd need some more details to be able to advise fully, but the best advice is to try to ensure that the appliance is safe (i.e. meets the standard) without having to rely on fuses in the mains supply.

Last updated: 2021-07-06 16:39

Posted 11 months ago
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Environment chambers for environment simulations or for laboratory purpose are covered by which standard?

Electrically powered laboratory equipment is normally the subject of the EN IEC 61010 series of standards. The relevant standards are:EN…

Electrically powered laboratory equipment is normally the subject of the EN IEC 61010 series of standards.

The relevant standards are:
EN IEC 61010-2-010 Lab equipment for the heating of materials
EN IEC 61010-2-011 Refrigerating equipment
EN IEC 61010-2-012 Temperature conditioning equipment

These are just an indicative list and a full standards check should be undertaken depending upon the specifications and features of the equipment.

Last updated: 2021-07-06 16:41

Posted 11 months ago
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The final assembled product will require CE marking as the standards used for the motor are likely not be appropriate for an enclosed product. You should identify the appropriate standards for the final product and check to those. Also consider that EMC and RoHS are most likely to be required as well. You should then issue your own Declaration of Conformity and keep the compliance information as part of your technical file.

Last updated: 2021-07-06 16:42

Posted 11 months ago
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All domestic electrical appliances sold in the UK are required to have a plug fitted to BS1363 or a conversion plug supplied/fitted to BS1363-5. Travel adaptors are not permitted to be supplied.

Last updated: 2021-07-06 16:43

Posted 11 months ago
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I understand that the mains supply voltages in UK have been changed to 230VAC from 240VAC. Is this correct? Where can I get the official documents regarding this?

The UK mains voltage is 240V which is within the EU limits of 230V +10%/-6%. The standard is EN 50160:2010…

The UK mains voltage is 240V which is within the EU limits of 230V +10%/-6%.

The standard is EN 50160:2010 and there is a 2019 amendment currently under review.

Last updated: 2021-07-06 16:59

Posted 11 months ago
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Control panels for machinery are normally within the scope of the LVD and EMC Directives and so they must be CE marked in the course of being supplied to the machine manufacturer.

It is important to understand that in these circumstances the CE mark on the panel does not necessarily indicate full compliance with the Machinery Directive, since very often the control panel manufacturer is not responsible for the functional specification for the panel. It is the final assembler of the machine who has responsibility for ensuring that all of the relevant requirements have been met, and using panels which have been correctly CE marked by their supplier will make this job easier.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 16:48

Posted 11 months ago
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Yes, it is necessary to CE mark control panels which are supplied separately, but only for the Low Voltage, EMC and RoHS directives. These Directives make no distinction between complete and incomplete equipment (unlike the Machinery Directive); for example the panels must be supplied electrically safe. Control panels on their own do not fall within the scope of the Machinery Directive.

However, the responsibility for ensuring that the control panel performs all the safety related functions required by the machinery (if any), lies with the supplier of the machinery. As the requirements of the these functions directly influence the design of the control circuit, it is necessary for the machinery supplier to specify, in detail, all the requirements of the panel. This could be achieved either by getting involved with the design of the panel and/or by fully specifying all the safety related control functions and their required performance in accordance with the relevant standards (e.g. EN 954-1:1996). It is also necessary for the machinery supplier to specify the ratings in detail. It is inappropriate for the machinery supplier to expect the panel builder to take responsibility of these issues because the panel builder would then be partly responsible for the design of the machine. The responsibility of the panel builder to comply with the specifications of the machine builder would be a contractual issue.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 16:50

Posted 11 months ago
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Your lamps need to be CE marked as an assembled complete product. 

The CE marking directives that apply to your product are the Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Directive, RoHS and the Low Voltage Directive (LVD). 

There are ecodesign requirements for bulbs and luminaires so these should be considered as part of the CE marking requirements.

The LVD tests ensure the product is safe under normal use and a single fault condition.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 16:52

Posted 11 months ago
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Are cables less than 3 m required to be CE compliant?

A cable irrespective of length is a finished product so it should be CE marked and WEEE marked. Last updated:…

A cable irrespective of length is a finished product so it should be CE marked and WEEE marked.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 16:53

Posted 11 months ago
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What is required in terms of compliance if the component parts of LCD TVs were imported from China and assembled/sold in the UK?

The final assembled product is subject to both UKCA and CE marking if the final destination is the UK and/or…

The final assembled product is subject to both UKCA and CE marking if the final destination is the UK and/or the EU markets. In general the individual components do not require to be CE marked but if they are it may assist the overall compliance assessment of the finished product.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 16:54

Posted 11 months ago
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In this case, we would agree with the manufacturer that CE marking is not required. The fuse holder is a component, and can only be used when incorporated into a piece of equipment which will itself need to be CE marked.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 17:07

Posted 11 months ago
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Yes, motors which are outside the scope of the LVD are covered by the Machinery Directive. You should also consider EMC, RoHS and Ecodesign requirements as well.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 17:08

Posted 11 months ago
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According to EN 60335-1 §25.10 if it is a Class I appliance then the earth wire in the supply cord MUST be green and yellow so a single green colour is not permitted.

In the UK brown and blue wires are used for single phase wiring designation.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 17:08

Posted 11 months ago
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EN 60204-1 clause 11.2.1 states:

"No devices except devices for operating, indicating, measuring, and cooling shall be mounted on doors or on normally removable access covers of enclosures."

Going beyond the limit imposed by the above quoted clause is generally to be discouraged, but it's perfectly possible to meet the EHSR's of the LVD or Machinery Directives if other mitigating measures are applied.

The provision of insulation to prevent finger access to any dangerous parts and marking on the outside of the panel are two examples of such measures.

Such a door should be separately earthed and not be reliant upon hinges for earthing.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 17:11

Posted 11 months ago
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A single declaration of conformity covering all the relevant legislation is required.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 17:12

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Regulation (EU) 2019/1020 require an EU Economic operator to be appointed who will be responsible for the compliance information within the EU and to be a contact point for the authorities. If you appoint an Authorised Representative then they will need to have a mandate in writing detailing their responsibilities and obligations.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 17:14

Posted 11 months ago
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1) A Notified or Approved Body is not required to be involved for the LVD compliance.
2) If there are no applicable harmonised standards then you can use other standards to show compliance with the essential requirements of the LVD. Remember to document this in the technical file for the product.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 17:17

Posted 11 months ago
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The new LVD 2014/35/EU requires the name, company name and address to be supplied on the product packaging /instructions. Also to be on the Declaration of Conformity.

The Declaration of Conformity is binding upon the company so if the person who sign it leave it is no problem. The position of the signatory also has to be indicated.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 17:19

Posted 11 months ago
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In order to place electrical items on the market in the UK they will need to be UKCA marked and comply with all relevant legislations.

The applicable legislations are:

The Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations SI 2016 No 1101
The Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulations 2016. SI No 1091
The Restriction of the Use of Certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations 2012. SI No 3032.

If the products are sold with an conversion plug this must conform with BS1363-5 requirements. Travel adaptors are NOT permitted.

Last updated: 2021-07-07 17:21

Posted 11 months ago
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